Tips for Beginner Runners

The new year is on the horizon, and you have decided you are going to take up running! Great! Here are some tips to help you ease into a new sport carefully, so that you reduce injury risk, build as a runner, and have fun. Be patient and remember to accept that you can’t be an expert in anything overnight. Enjoy the journey and learn from your experience.

  • Start where you are! Nobody begins as an expert. If day #1 is literally day #1, simply start from today. Keep all running to a 4-5 out of 10 perceived exertion for the first 3-6 weeks to carefully build up strength and adaption to stress. You’ll be improving cardio strength, bone density, stamina and build mitochondria. Even if you can only hold your run for 1 minute – start there. Walk/runs are a normal place for many people to start. Alternating walk/runs for 20-30 minutes per day, 3-4X per week, and you’ll be surprised how quickly you’ll adapt.
  • Consistency is key – just like with anything new. Put your runs on your calendar with meetings and social events. Prioritize and then carve out that time to running. If motivation is necessary, recruit a running buddy for the journey, or listen to a podcast you love while running.
  • Don’t compare yourself to other runners! You don’t know their journey. But you do know yours. It’s new and in it’s infancy. Enjoy this new adventure.
  • Buy actual running shoes. Running can be a low-tech and fairly inexpensive sport, but investing in the right footwear can be a game changer with comfort and injury-prevention. While there’s no magic shoe for everyone, your magic shoe is one that feels like “home,” and supports the demands and needs of your body.
  • Celebrate little victories! We don’t see or feel changes due to a new routine overnight. It takes a little time to adapt and grow. So don’t focus on the instant gratification. Instead, focus on that day or that week, and then own that accomplishment of successfully completing your runs!
  • Rest days are important. While obviously you can’t run sporadically and get better, you adapt to the hard work while you rest. So get sleep. Get in 2-3 total rest days per week while starting out, spread throughout the week. It’s tempting to go balls to the wall. While that motivation and drive is great, it can lead to overtraining injuries and burnout – both of which can often be avoided.
  • Mix it up. Take a different route. Run inside and outside. Take a treadmill class (like with me at Mile High Run Club!). Switch up the time of day you run. You don’t know in the early stages what’s your best groove, so mix it up until you find it.
  • Have fun and set a distant goal! This should be an activity that brings something positive to your life, and enriches you. Not every run will be rainbows and unicorns, but most of the runs should feel physically and mentally good. Perhaps sign up for a 5K race in a few months and recruit your friends. Race in costume. Set a time goal. This sport is unique to you, so make it yours!