The Twelve Myths of Fitness – Day 10: Lifting heavy will make women bulk

While some people are super passionate about cleanses or the newest fitness trend, today’s myth is near and dear to my heart. But I won’t lead with my opinions. I’ll do my best to lead purely with research, science and facts – and to perhaps toss in my own experience as a woman, a personal trainer and an athlete.

For whatever reason, many women believe lifting heavy will make them bulk up. In my Mile High Run Club Dash28 class, I always stress that you should be lifting the heaviest weight possible, as long as you can manage it with good form. And guess what – there’s always a decent percent of women who reach for the 2lb. kettle bell – and then use it for squats! Honestly, if you are going to take the baby weight for those large power muscles, just do a bodyweight squat. To make gains in fitness, you need to stress your body. Lifting a 2lb. weight for a thousand reps will never make you look any different. And while you may be a little stronger, you make big gains in strength and appearance when you lift heavy.

And as Medical Daily explains, lifting heavy increases metabolic rate (you’ll burn more calories), and so fat loss is pretty much inevitable as long as you aren’t consuming additional calories. You’ll be stronger and leaner, and other benefits include increased mobility, preventing muscle loss, fixing posture, and alleviating back pain. And if are still worried about bulking up, relax. It’s incredibly difficult for most women to do. For one thing, our testosterone level isn’t high enough to increase mass. And unless you are consuming excess calories, you have nothing to worry about.

And aside from the sleek muscles you can be sporting, there are lots of health reasons to lift heavy – especially as you age. Bone and joints will have a better shot of staying happy and healthy, your agility, balance, and energy will thank you. You’ll also probably carry less body fat, which as an aging female can be tough to manage. Establishing a weight training routine now, no matter your age or fitness level, is the right step. Here are some good points and tips for getting started.

Personally, I have found lifting heavy to transform my body in a bunch of ways. I am more defined and have lost fat. I am stronger. I am a far more efficient and faster runner – especially on hills or late in a race. And honestly, I feel better in my skin. Muscles and strength makes me feel more confident and sexy. A thousand years ago when I was lifting light (and weight a good 10lbs less than now), I was skinny but I wasn’t nearly the confident woman or athlete I am now. And most importantly to me, I was more injury-prone back then. My injury risk has gone way down with my improvements in strength and power.

It’s important to focus on quality in the gym. Don’t rush your workout and give rest/recovery between sets. Focus on full range of motion. Be sure you are using good form and make adjustments to the machine for your body. Hydrate throughout the day, and get in some protein after your gym session. A shake, greek yogurt, lean meat, a banana with peanut butter – whatever is appealing to you. As a rule of thumb, you will usually feel the progress before you see it. Focus on consistency. Your body will change. Sadly most of us get frustrating and give up before our bodies begin to really show the progress. Keep at it.

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